Thursday, January 28, 2010

Styles for different birds?

Mike's comments on shooting books brought something to mind ... I find that my shooting styles don't quickly adapt to different conditions and species. For example, I hunted quail a couple weeks ago and was very successful with an instinctive see-swing-mount-shoot. On the other hand, my shooting on the opening day of dove season can be pretty miserable as I dial in the leads that are needed for 30+ yard crossing shots. I think Mike uses a consistent method for all his shooting. How about other folks?

7 comments:

Mike Spies said...

Pete - I have seen you shoot and you seem to hit what you're shooting at. Missing at doves? Join the club!

Jon Uhart said...

One of my biggest frustrations hunting public ground in Kansas is how different bobwhite and pheasants can act. I've found it easier to "think quail" when approaching a point that could be either, and if I'm wrong then focusing on one cackling rooster is easier. Imagine the contrary, expecting one large bird and then having twenty buzzbombs attempt to fly up your nose. I always miss those.

In Montana I found myself exclusively "snap shooting," because the huns never let us get very close before flushing.

I'm not sure if that's what you were asking...but I think what's going on between my ears has more to do with my shooting success than any other one thing.

Will Pennington said...
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Will Pennington said...

Generally Orvis/Bowlen here but I'm a bit of a cherry picker and usually pass on long range shots.

Mike Spies said...

Jon wrote, "...but I think what's going on between my ears has more to do with my shooting success than any other one thing."

I agree - you need to disengage the brain and route the shot from the eyes directly to the hands. A lobotomy is one cure for over thinking the shot!

Craig Peters Rising Sun, MD 410-658-1091 said...

These days I shoot at 99% grouse and woodcock. But I find the slow, big birds the easiest. Woodcock are easy because of the slow part. I don't shoot too fast and can slowly go through the motions in no hurry on them and I bet I am at 75%. I always found pheasants in front of a pointing dog laughable with the only difficulty keeping the bird pinned and flushing without a twist. Shooting unpointed pheasants changes all that. Had a bad year on sharptails when I tried that so not much sample there. As stated, grouse give me fits because of the combo of the fact you can never figure where they are coming from, they are fast as hell with all that cover and your mind knows it, and as said I can not get a visual on them to mount-swing-shoot. Mmmmpht.

Here's another thought. I shoot at a conservative guess, 100% better when by myself. Throw one or more people along and I can't shoot well and don't even shoot half the time.

珊珊李 said...
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